Skip to main content

Table 1 Key literature results

From: The aerodynamics of voiced stop closures

 TokensMeasuresOral airflow effect of vowel context
Bucella et al. [10]Sustained vowels /i, a, u/Mean mid-vowel oral airflow amplitudeSignificant vowel effect
Cho et al. [11]Bilabial stops (fortis, lenis and aspirated) in three real words (same vowel context)Maximum oral airflow after stop releaseSignificant effect of stop category (fortis, lenis and aspirated)
Higgins et al. [21]Isolated repetitions of /pi/ and /pɑ/, and repetitions of <buy pip again> and <buy pap again>Mean mid-vowel oral airflow amplitudeNo significant intrasubject differences across vowel type
Higgins et al. [22]Isolated repetitions of /pi/ and /pɑ/, and repetitions of <buy pip again> and <buy pap again>Mean mid-vowel oral airflow amplitudeNo significant interactions involving the factor of vowel for mean airflow
Koenig et al. [30]Repetitions of <poppa popper> and <poppa bopper>VCV oral airflow signals used to identify voicing onset and offset during stop closureSome of the stops’ oral airflow signals “did not show abrupt changes associated with vocal-tract closure and release, suggesting lenition or spirantization” ([30], p. 1080)
Koenig et al. [31]Voiceless glottal fricative /h/ produced in repetitions of the sentences <a papa hopper>, <a papa hippie> and <a papa hooper>Oral airflow amplitude at voicing onset and offset during stop closure“…individual speakers have unique methods of achieving phonatory goals during running speech.” ([31], p. 2535)
“… the direction of vowel effects differed across speakers …” ([31], p. 2548)
Netsell et al. [37]CV syllables where C was /p/, and V was /i/ or /a/Mean mid-vowel oral airflow amplitudeNo significant difference between oral airflow for [i] versus [a]
\